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20130201
20130228
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. the u.s. trade gap narrows as the world buys more made in america products and the u.s. buys less foreign oil. >> susie: and with gas prices rising, chevy hopes its new diesel chevy cruze will attract buyers looking for more miles per gallon. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> susie: millions of people are bracing tonight for a powerful snow storm that could cripple the east coast. some forecasters say this could be the blizzard of the century with record amounts of snow and extremely strong winds. in parts of the northeast, transportation was shut down. the governors of massachusetts and connecticut declared a state of emergency and banned car travel, train service and cancelled flights in and out of boston. while the worst of the storm has yet to hit, many businesses and cities were busy making preparations today. erika miller reports. >> reporter: this monstrous storm is already being compared to the great blizzard of '78, when vast amounts of snow blanketed the ohio valley and the great lakes. that storm lasted 36 hours, leaving cars stranded. this storm could also b
eliminating hunger and we have work to do. fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. pbs station from viewers like thank you. tavis: jamie williams is a noted author. she is -- amy wilentz is a noted author. her latest revisits the nation of haiti. it is called "farewell, fred voodoo." we should start by talking about the title. >> friend voodoo is a name the international press corps used to name for the haitian on the street. what i would like to say is they are trained to go deeper than that and not just have a stereotypical view of haitians and what old colonists used to associate with their religion, but something real and in control of their own will, so farewell to the old image. let's look get the new -- look at the new haiti. tavis: what would you say is the typical american view? >> there is a lot of reality. impoverished. we associate in the u.s. poverty with backwardness, especially in a nation filled with akron people is american thing. and there is to do, -- is voodoo, and that image of them being associated with religion thought of assets --
the nation of afghanistan and the air force base in the u.s. state of nevada. drones come in various shapes, sizes and weights. they are used for surveillance, disablement, and killing. and drones are increasingly ubiquitous. there are 64 drone bases spread across the united states alone, and the u.s. has other drone installations across the planet. africa is increasingly a drone base environment. a newly authorized site in the nation of niger will become the sixth u.s. drone base in africa, joining one in morocco, senegal, uganda, and a permanent one in djibouti. u.s. drone attacks ordered by obama have spiked particularly in yemen, somalia, afghanistan, and notably pakistan where over 360 drone strikes over the nine years, 2004 to 2013, have killed over 3,000 people. this data is not classified. and not even secret. but it is troubling. so troubling that the u.n. has just decided to launch an investigation on the impacts of drone strikes on thousands of civilians. question. will the u.n. human rights council rule that drone use violates international law do you think, pat buchanan? >> i d
of last year, there are fresh worries about the state of the u.s. economy and profits for this year. on top of that, financial conditions in the eurozone are still a threat to u.s. stocks. >> with the market at current levels, which... basically looks like they're priced for perfection, there doesn't leave a lot of room for any disappointing news. and there are a lot of areas that could create disappointing news. >> reporter: weissberg says many market pros believe stocks are headed higher, but they need a catalyst, and that's unlikely to come from tonight's state of the union. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: still ahead, why ailing smartphone maker blackberry is hoping the sports market will help it on its road to recovery. we'll explain in tonight's "beyond the scoreboard." a "silly sideshow--" that's what apple c.e.o. tim cook called a recent lawsuit filed by hedge fund manager david einhorn. speaking at a goldman sachs technology conference today, cook also said apple is considering einhorn's proposal to issue preferred stock and return more money to shareholders. e
. the u.s. airways/american airlines merger is ready for take-off, and the companies say they see no turbulence ahead from washington regulators. and senate democrats offer their plan to head off the sequester's sharp spending cuts. we get the details from michigan senator debbie stabenow. we have that and more tonight on "n.b.r." two big sweetheart deals on this valentine's day: american airlines is merging with u.s. airways, creating the world's largest airline company; and warren buffett is buying h.j. heinz, the biggest food company acquisition ever. we'll have more on american in a moment, but we begin tonight with buffett and that surprising mega-food deal. the billionaire investor is teaming up with the billionaire owners of 3g capital to buy the ketchup maker for $28 billion. the private equity group and buffett's berkshire hathaway are paying $72.50 a share in cash. that's a 20% premium over heinz's closing price yesterday. ruben ramirez reports. >> reporter: the oracle of omaha now has a new title: ketchup king. for the first time, warren buffett, who's shied away from w
outside the u.s. >> reporter: anheuser-busch inbev offered to sell of it's interest in an importing arm to constellation brands and make the company the sole importer of corona beer for ten years. but the justice department says that solution does not go far enough. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> susie: on wall street today, stocks finished lower on mixed news about the economy, and worries about tomorrow's important jobs report. jobless claims rose by 38,000, more than expected. consumer spending rose slightly in december, as personal income climbed 2.6%, the highest increase in eight years, on this last trading day of january, the dow lost almost 50 points, the nasdaq was unchanged, and the s&p fell about four points. despite the sell off today, january was a strong month for stocks. the dow surged 6%, its best january since 1994. a 4% gain on the nasdaq, and the s&p jumped 5%. on wall street, they say a big january for stocks usually means a big year as well, it's called the "january barometer." if stocks follow history, they could be up by 20% or more. will that hold true in
. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." investors spent much of this week focused on the u.s. market with major market indexes hitting five-year highs. but now the spotlight is shifting overseas. g-20 finance ministers and central bankers are meeting in moscow over the weekend. they will be debating the need for austerity, versus the need to spur growth. no one expects a quick turnaround for the european economy, which has been mired in recession. but as erika miller reports, that may make now a good time to invest. >> reporter: it would makes sense that american investors would be loading up on u.s. stocks with the market here doing so well. but they're not. last week, investors in stock mutual funds put virtually all their cash in international markets. more than $3 billion went into funds holding international stocks. by comparison, mutual funds holding u.s. stocks suffered their first outflows of the year. investment advisors say small investors may be on to something. >> international investing has had a bad reputation over the last couple of years had a bad experience, people have taken money ou
in commodities. >> susie: and u.s. companies and infrastructure are increasing under the threat of cyber attack. we look at a new plan tying safeguards to trade policy. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: on the comeback trail, hewlett packard posting better than expected first quarter results tonight, as a wide- ranging revamp of the struggling computer maker takes hold. and its shares take flight, rising over 6% in after hours trading. h.p. earned $0.82 a share, $0.11 better than wall street had anticipated. and revenues, while down at $28.4 billion, also beat the street. c.e.o. meg whitman has been on the job 17 months, speaking with investors today, whitman said she felt good about the rest of the year, and that last year's hard work was paying off for h.p. but, analysts say h.p. is not out of the woods yet. >> it's the type of thing that can be fixed quickly. this isn't going to take several years to play out so first of all it seems like meck whitman's vision is very much on track but we're not seeing that play out in the financials, but it is encouraging that guidance wa
those retail numbers are a positive sign for the u.s. economy. investors were worried about some not so good signals today about europe's economy. stocks turned negative on comments from europe's central bank president saying the strong euro could dampen europe's recovery. here on wall street, the dow fell 42 points, the nasdaq lost three and the s&p slipped over two points. >> tom: still ahead, douglas burtnick joins us, he's with aberdeen asset management. >> susie: a battle is brewing between a big name hedge fund investor and apple. at issue: how to get apple to unlock value for shareholders. today david einhorn of greenlight capital sued apple to block a move that would stop the use of preferred shares. shareholders will vote on this at apple's annual meeting on february 27. what einhorn is proposing is that apple pay out more of its cash hoard to investors, using a special kind of preferred stock. einhorn has a lot at stake: his fund owns more than one million shares of apple, and while the stock rose a bit today, it's down 35% since its peak of $700 last september. late today app
, and investors are seeing in the u.s. economy. we preview the economic state of the union. why regulators need to treat them like other business. then u.s. airways sees big benefits in merging with american airlines. we look at the new landscape for airlines if the deal goes through. we have that anmore tonight on nbr. president obama is preparing to deliver his first state of the union address of his new term, tomorrow. the american people will be listening carefully to his plans to grow the economy, especially as they struggle with less take home pay, and worries about their jobs. while there are signs of improvement in the economy, the unemployment rate rose in january to 7.9%. so what is the current state of the economy? erika miller talked to two experts with different views. >> reporter: it may seem strange to many investors that the stock market can be hovering at five- year highs, when the economy is so weak. but what's fueling the rally is not the current situation, it's hope. >> we've taken out some of the downside tail risks. so, we're feeling like although it's not going to be a bo
by groups opposed to economic reform, on top of that, u.s. equities face a looming friday deadline for massive government budget cuts, known as "sequestration." the dow tumbled 216 points, the nasdaq fell nearly 46, and the s&p 500 lost 28 points. while there's been much talk of a correction in the stock market, sequestration may not be the catalyst. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: it is widely accepted on wall street that sequestration is coming. and, with it a new reason for the fragile u.s. economy to sputter. but, what will the first phase of billions of dollars in federal spending cuts actually do to the u.s. stock market? after all, major market averages are hovering close to all-time highs, and don't forget investors are finally warming up to equities again. floor broker art cashin says today's selling was mostly a reaction to italy's election, and that the stock market is not yet focused on sequestration. >> i don't think that even we slip into sequestration it will have the same dramatic effect that the fiscal cliff and the debt ceiling had. it is seen as somewhat temp
rain and snow, but not on saturdays. the u.s. postal service is dropping saturday letter deliveries to save billions. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. fresh pain at the pump. american drivers see a steep jump in gas prices: up 15 cents a gallon in the past week alone. >> susie: and the federal reserve says it's been hit, by cyber hackers. we look at u.s. businesses and just how safe their networks are. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the u.s. postal service says this summer it will stop delivering mail on saturdays, ending a service that began 150 years ago. cutting back to a five-day a week schedule will save $2- billion. the post office has been losing about $20 million a day, as e- mail useage ramps up and mail volume plunges. congress has required the post office to deliver six days a week, but the postmaster general believes there is a loophole in the law that will allow him to make the change. darren gersh reports on the business fallout. >> reporter: first class mail is the postal service's most profitable product. it is also a business that is disappearing at the
's previous two tests. the first in 2006 and the second in 2009. the u.s. geological survey detected a 4.9 magnitude seismic event in the area, more powerful than the 4.5 that registered in 2009 after north korea's second test. scientists in multiple countriesing detected the explosion. north korea issued a confirmation, declaring the test was quote, carried out at a high level in a safe and perfect manner using a miniatureized de greater explosive force than previously, unquoted. pyongyang also declared the the reckless hostility of the united states. unquote. in a state of the union address tuesday president obama had this to say. >> provocation of the sort we saw last night will only further isolate them as we standby our allies, strengthen our own missile defense and lead the world in taking firm action in response to defense and take firm action in respnorth threats. >> this is north korea's first successfully launched a long range rocket, raising fears north korea now has the capability to hit the united states. question. what is the real story behind kim jong un's nuclear test? mo
world. >> and -- >> there is not a country in the world that believes that the u.s. drone attacks that we are doing on countries that we are not at war with is the right and sustainable solution for us. >> all we have is the president interpreting his own powers and the limits on his own powers. and that is not the way it's supposed to work. we need more oversight. >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org.
!." there is a u.s. tour also under way. we are glad you joined us. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hungerwalmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. tavis: this month marks the 50th anniversary of the animals. eric burden's career has continued as a solo artist and with a group war. his latest album is called "til your river runs dry!" >> ♪ mother, tell your children, not to do what i have done ♪ ♪ spend your life in sheer misery, in the house of the rising sun ♪ tavis: does it feel like five decades? >> if i look at some of them. >> you did not like that suit? >> not really. thought was a time. it was so rough doing stuff like that. it was shot at 9:00 in the morning, and it was shot in a pan of vision, and why and blends, you are not ready for that kind of stuff. i was happy without sonders and what abo
because of the legal journey. khalid el-masri also had cases here in the united states. and the u.s. courts actually refused to look into the merits of those claims, looking at things like the state secrets privilege or different types of immunities that would keep him as a torture victim from being vindicated in u.s. courts. so in fact what i think is the lesson here is not so much that the european courts could make those findings. it's that the european court did make those findings. >> you mean he couldn't have gotten a fair trial or the courts wouldn't at least give him a trial in this country? >> in this country, very few of the post-9/11 torture victims have ever had their day in court. and in fact, until recently the center for constitutional rights has been successful in a settlement. we got $5.2 million from u.s. corporations who were involved in harsh interrogation and torture in abu ghraib for 72 torture victims. but none of those cases have gone through adjudications. no court has made a finding the way that the european court did about the circumstances of their tortur
and untapped the nation's worst oil spill. on monday in new orleans, the civil trial pitting the u.s. government and gulf coast states against b.p. is due to begin. ruben ramirez has a preview of the case and the possibility of a last minute deal. >> reporter: nearly three years after a rig explosion killed 11 people and spilled four million barrels of oil into the gulf of mexico the u.s. government and b.p. are set to square off in a louisiana courtroom. b.p. has a history of settling civil cases before or during trial, so an eleventh hour deal could still be reached. the justice department and gulf states are considering offering b.p. a $16 billion deal, that's nearly three times what b.p. had hoped to pay. for it's part, b.p. says: >> we have always been open to settlements on reasonable terms, faced with demands that are excessive and not based on reality or the merits of the case, we are going to trial. >> reporter: if there is no settlement over the weekend, well owner b.p. will be joined by rig owner transocean and halliburton, the cement services provider on the well. on the
to last. siemens, answers. >> theu.s.economyinthefourthquarte of. the u.s. economy in the fourth quarter of last year october, november, december contracted by 0. 1%. one-tenth of 1%. it was the first contraction in three years and it rattles financial markets. much of the slippage in gross domestic product, was due to what the u.s. federal reserves describes as quote weather related disruptions and other transitory facts unquote. the central bank is keeping monetary policy on hold. and says n worth of long-term securities a month, until there is a substantial improvement in the outlook for the labor market. also, the cut back in department of defense outlays, is likely to fuel concerns about the size of a slow down and the full economic fallout of the large quote unquote sequester cuts scheduled for a month from now, the start of march. the president's press secretary said this about the sequester. quote, across-the-board cuts to education, to research and development, would have repeat, would have, damaging effects on our economy and our long-term economic prospects. unquote. a growing
to be the best cliche for the u.s. job market, right now. the nation's unemployment rate has been lurking just around 8% for the last six months. and, the number of news jobs created is barely keeping pace with population growth. still, some economists think the latest labor data is encouraging. >> when we look at the number of jobs being created even though it was a tad below expectations, it was still a healthy number that should continue to help the economy. >> reporter: the main reason for optimism: those positive revisions to november and december jobs data. it turns out, the government underestimated how many positions were added by 127,000. it was that miscount that helped push the dow over 14,000 for the first time in more than five years. and, at 14,000 the blue-chip index is about 150 to 200 points away from its all-time high. market pros like wayne kaufman predict new highs for stocks in coming weeks. >> many investors, retail investors, individual investors are reaching the point of recognition where they no longer believe the economy is going to collapse again, or that the stock m
, working with our very own defense department, invented the internet in the first place. back then, the u.s. was in the catbird seat, poised to lead the world down this astonishing new superhighway of information and innovation. now many other countries offer their citizens faster and cheaper access than we do. the faster high-speed access comes through fiber optic lines that transmit data in bursts of laser light, but many of us are still hooked up to broadband connections that squeeze digital information through copper wire. we're stuck with this old-fashioned technology because, as susan crawford explains, our government has allowed a few giant conglomerates to rig the rules, raise prices, and stifle competition. just like standard oil in the first gilded age a century ago. in those days, it was muckrakers like ida tarbell and lincoln steffens rattling the cages and calling for fair play. today it's independent thinkers like susan crawford. the big telecom industry wishes she would go away, but she's got a lot of people on her side. in fact, if you go to the white house citizen's petitio
hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> with a new pope about to be chosen in rome and the church under severe criticism for its handling of sexual-abuse cases, what is the path forward for the more than 77 million american catholics? a professor of theological ethics at loyola marymount university, raised catholic, dr. gina messina-dysert. deeply engaged in the ongoing debate about the future of catholicism in america. professor, good to have you on this program. >> thank you so much. tavis: let me start with the obvious. many of us, even those of us who are not catholic, this has not happened in 600 years, so it has not happened in our lifetimes, that we have had an ex-pope. >> certainly, this is a significant historical event. this is the first pope to step down in 600 years and one of only 10 in the entire history of the catholic church. people are really curious what this means. will it is rin
industry. >> susie: the u.s. government wants as much as $5 billion from standard and poors, officially accusing the credit ratings agency of fraud during the housing boom. >> tom: and earnings from a trio of consumer stocks finds us spending money on eating out and watching tv. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> tom: a bold new chapter for computer maker dell was opened today. michael dell said today he's taking the company he founded almost 30 years ago private. it's a $24.5 billion deal offering dell investors $13.65 per share. now, at one point, dell was the largest p.c. maker in the world, boasting market capitalization of more than $100 billion. now, it sits behind apple, hewlett packard and lenovo, valued a fifth of what it once was. ruben ramirez begins are coverage. >> reporter: michael dell admits he missed the consumer shift away from the p.c. to tablets and smartphones, but today's announcement his company is going private doesn't necessary address how dell is going to try to capture those markets. >> they want to continue to be a hardware player, but the questio
and boost hiring. the fed has been buying $85 billion a month in american i.o.u.'s since last september. while it won't stop the strategy, it will soon start talking about how to stop. >> we haven't done a new review of the exit strategy yet. i think we will have to do that sometime soon. even if we don't sell any securities, it doesn't mean that our balance sheet is going to be large for many years, it just would be maybe an extra year, that's all it would take to get down to a more normal size. >> tom: other factors at play on wall street today included, an auction of italian bonds was well received, fending off new worries about the european debt crisis. and here in the u.s., january durable goods orders rose almost 2%, for their largest gain in over a year, and well above expectations for a modest 0.2% gain. the stock market got no help today from technology giant apple, apple shares slipped about one percent after investors were disappointed nothing concrete came out of the company's annual shareholder meeting. no word on a stock split, new product or most of all what apple plans t
in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: taj mahal's eclectic career braces blues, jazz, americana. nine grammy nominations. he has been on a musical odyssey. that journey can be heard now in a new boxed set that includes 15 cds, 170 tracks. here is a small taste of this remarkable compilation. >> ♪ if i ever get out of this prison, i am going to do just like i please ♪ ♪ i am going to take off running to the nearest stretch of trees ♪ ♪ i am going to keep running, running, running through the years bunch of trees -- the nearest bunch of trees ♪ ♪ i am going to be running through these trees ♪ ♪daddy going to be running so fast it looks like daddy been running on his knees ♪ tavis: you just mentioned daddy, and i think that is a great way to start. tell me about your daddy's record collection. >> he is an interesting guy. my grandparents came here about 100 years ago and started having children in new york city. my dad was born in 1915, and everybody is going to notice
-- including u.s. government officials who in 2007 publicly stated that problems in the subprime market appeared to be contained." >> reporter: s&p goes on to argue that the securities at issue in the justice department's case were reviewed by another ratings agency and received the same rating. s&p says it also began downgrading many mortgage securities in 2006, warning that conditions in the housing market were deteriorating. but critics say what matters is what s&p claimed at the time it stamped securities triple a. >> the ratings agencies claim that they have unique analytic abilities and very sophisticated models that enable them to determine the credit worthiness of a bond, a derivative, a security. >> reporter: s&p points out court rulings have dismissed what it called challenges to a credit rating made with 20/20 hindsight. if the justice department does sue, standard and poor's says it will vigorously defend itself. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> tom: still ahead, tonight's word on the street: consumers, the street.com's david peltier joins us with some consumer product
's calling on congress to pass legislation to give the u.s. government the capacity it needs to secure our networks. the president also issued an executive order, to create cyber security standards for u.s. businesses, and for the government to share more information about threats. but cyber security experts, say while that sounds easy, it's hard to do. >> you can't just inform one party necessarily, you might really have an obligation as a government to inform every player in a sector, and then of course that's a high bar, because you're sharing the information with a lot of people which increases the likelihood that it might get out back into the wrong hands. >> susie: beckstrom says the threat of cyber attack or manipulation to critical infrastructure like the power grid and transportation systems is much worse than most people expect. from the "ramones" to the "clash," still ahead, investing in punk rock history, and the prices might surprise you. after the closing bell on wall street today, record revenues for cisco systems: $12.1 billion. that gave the networking equipment maker earn
to a busy start this year as corporate america is feeling the urge to merge. from the american airlines-u.s. airways deal to warren buffet's ketchup acquisition, multibillion-dollar marriages are fast and furious. there's even an office romance brewing between office depot and office max. all the pairing can be good for shareholders of the acquired firms, not to mention investment bankers, but what does it mean for the broader stock market? floor broker doreen mogavero says it's definitely a vote of confidence for the stock market, but she worries about long-term ramifications for the economy. >> i'm not so sure how much consolidation is actually good because that to me actually means job losses at the administrative level, factory level and even c.e.o. level. so-- i'm not that worried about the c.e.o.s, but still. >> reporter: this year, as m&a activity heats up, stocks have resisted a much talked about correction. the dow, s&p 500 and nasdaq are all up a healthy amount. investment pro sam stovall says if the majority of deals are cash, as many have been in 2013, it suggests the m&a cycle
hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: malik bendielloul, a documentary filmmaker behind one of the most talked-about documentaries, "searching for sugar man." it tells the remarkable story about rodriguez's remarkable comeback in south africa. the film is of for an oscar this year. here are some scenes. >> if ever there is an air of mystery around a pop artist, it is around the artist known as rodriguez. >> he was a wandering spirit around the city. ♪ >> it is a mystery, but it spread quickly. to many of us south africa as he was the soundtrack of our lives. it was the first who opposition to apartheid. he was a mystery. then we found out he committed suicide, and a lot of people have different versions of the story. i thought it would make a good story. there is nothing on the record to tell us who he was or where he was from, so we started to look at the lyrics. we found him. >> he was doing the work nobody else wanted to do he was
billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> bernie sanders is the longest serving independence in congress in his third term after 16 years in the house. he is also the new chair of the veterans affairs committee. it is always good to have you on this program. thanks for your time. >> great to be with you. >> let me start with where we are now. we are caught between the president's inauguration day speech and his state of the union address. i want to cover both in just a second and so much more, but let me start with the inauguration speech. this is the first time we have gotten a chance to talk in person. we did not get a chance to talk that day, so let me start by asking your thoughts about the inauguration speech. the media story on the speech was that it was a very liberal, very progressive view the president expressed from what he wanted to get done in the next four years as the longest serving independent, how did you hear the speech. but the phraseology, we have to ask ourselves exactly wh
hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: tony goldwyn is an actor who stars on "scandal." is now in its second season and airs thursday night's. >> here is what is great about having someone attempt to assassinate you. doctors are yelling, and you could die, and you suddenly stop being afraid. then when you do not die, you realize you have nothing to lose and no time to waste. this is going to happen. i am going to divorce and remain president of the united states. that is my job. do your job. work out the details. make it happen during your -- make it happen. >> you are out of your mind. a sitting president cannot divorce his wife. >> i think you are probably right about that. he has got a few problems on his plate. >> when you saw this, what is it the most intriguing view about wanting to play a. there have been several people who have played president of the united states, but this moment with the vigor and use of the obama administration, there is so much focus placed on t
. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: david o. russell was up for two oscars next month. it is often hard to quantify the role of director, but getting a good performance of the test is certainly at the top of the list. for the first time since 1981, all four principal actors in this movie are up for an oscar. quite an achievement. so much to get to tonight, but first, here are some scenes from "silver linings playbook." >> what is this i just hear about you getting out from the loony bin? i thought you said you had it together, you were solid? >> i am solid. >> i just want us to be friends. >> i was having sex with everybody in the office. >> everybody? how many you were there? >> don't let tiffany get you in trouble. >> i can only do if i have a partner. >> is this the girl that you wrote about? >> you wrote about me? >> we are friends. >> went live reaches out with a moment like this, it is a sin if you don't reach back. tavis: i am t
a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station by viewers like you. thank you. tavis: mark pinksy is the president and ceo of a nonprofit designed to align money and capital with political, economic, and social justice, opportunity finance network. ofm, and i am sure we will get to that. good to have you on the program. >> good to be here. tavis: i am not the only one continuing to do as much as we can on the issue of poverty, and this includes so much. what often does not get talked about is the fight back. i do not want to be guilty of only talking about the ugly and the bad but not talk about the significant work done by those who are trying to dig their way out over this hole that so many of all colors find themselves in. your company hopes to try to alleviate this pain and suffering. let me talk to you about what ofm does and get some specifics about the fight back on poverty. >> i appreciate your pain attention to this issue because it is one that often gets l
to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: josh gad got a tony nomination, and he is now the star of the commonly "1600 penn," and here is a scene from "1600 penn." >> hi. what if i told you i found a way to combine one of my great passions with an employment opportunity? >> just make sure you thought it through. >> i am going off script now. you know i have got the skills. you have always said, "do what you love, and the money will follow." >> that is not the case with magic. >> what is that? i believe this is yours, sir. do you not want to ask how i did that? tavis: is the obama era at the right time -- i am not making judgment one way or another, but is this the right time for this type of sitcom? >> interestingly enough, the obama administration invited us to screen it. we got their blessing. ironically, the obama speech writer is our head writer, and so i think so. but the interesting thing about it, it is not necessarily a sh
eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: i am sure none of us has to be reminded just how much twitter, facebook, and instagram an old email as transform our lives. in a new text called "citizenville," gavin newsom looks at how it can help break through gridlock and ensure that everyone in this country as a seat at the decision making. good to have you on. >> thanks. tavis: first of all, congratulations on your wife's recent spirit award. >> yes, she just one of the spirit award, and then they are nominated for their documentary called "the invisible war," which is about raved in the military. understanding some of the complexities. even if only 10 percent of this film is right, as i told my wife, we should stop and own up to it. leon panetta weighed in on this, and hopefully others will. it goes to the frustration. this is frankly one of the reasons why i wrote this book. i am so disinterested
its easy efforts to stimulate the economy had u.s. markets seeing green. the dow gained 116, the nasdaq is up 13, and the s&p rose nine. washington bureau chief darren gersh has details on the fed chairman's strong defense of his aggressive policy to support the economy. >> reporter: sure, there are risks when the federal reserve is buying almost $3 billion worth of bonds every day. but chairman ben bernanke told congress basically, "we got this." >> although a long period of low rates could encourage excessive risk taking, and continued close attention to such developments is certainly warranted, to this point, we do not see potential costs to the increased risk- taking in some financial markets is outweighing the benefits of promoting a stronger economic recovery and more rapid job creation. >> reporter: with unemployment stuck around 8% and inflation subdued at 1.5%, there are no economic red lights flashing. so bernanke gave no signals he was ready to change course or back away from his aggressive program to get the economy back to a more normal level of output. still, t
that the people who put food on our tables use food stamps at twice the rate as the rest of the u.s. workforce. meaning that the people who put food on our tables can't afford to put food on their own family's tables. >> funding is provided by carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org. anne gumowitz. the betsy and jesse fink foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized indivi
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